Browse Month: October 2019

Choosing the Right Baling Wire Gauge: A Guide

Wire gauge is the thickness of wire. Some may find it confusing, but for historical reasons lower gauge wire is actually thicker. Choosing the right baling wire is important because if you choose wire that has too low a gauge for your needs you may not be maximizing your cost-effectiveness, and if you choose a wire that has too high a gauge it may not withstand the pressure and break.

Baling gauges depend on the type of baler you are using, as well as the density and dimensions of your bales. The material you are baling can also affect the type of gauge you need, as some materials put more pressure on wires than others.

Vertical Balers

Vertical balers are typically used for small volumes and limited budgets, good for producing about two bales a day. These balers commonly require 12, 13 or 14 gauge wire. They are commonly used to bale corrugated cardboard, plastic wrap, and textiles, but can bale other materials.

For cardboard: Look for lighter 13 or 14 gauge wire.

For newspaper: Look for slightly thicker 12 gauge wire, but 13 can often suffice.

For plastic shrink wrap: Look for 13 or 14 gauge wire.

For other plastics: The gauge may need to be as low as 12.

For foam: You need to use thicker wire, 11 gauge is standard, for example.

Horizontal Balers

Horizontal balers are for continuous use and can be automatic or manual, fit for processing wider ranges of materials such as thicker cardboard and plastic containers.

For cardboard: Horizontal balers can use wire as thick as 11 gauge, up to 13 gauge.

For newspaper: 12 or 13 gauge wire is still recommended.

For plastics (including shrink wrap): You can use 11 or 12 gauge wire.

For foam: 11 gauge is recommended with horizontal balers.

Single Ram Auto Tie Balers

Single ram auto tie balers are the best for baling high volumes of paper or corrugated cardboard and can use stronger wire. These are common in recycling centers, printing plants, and box manufacturers.

For almost all materials, single ram auto tie balers typically use 10, 11 or 12 gauge wire. The thickness needed often depends on the volume of material being baled. The exception is foam, for which 12 gauge wire is not strong enough. 10 or 11 gauge is hence recommended.

Two Ram Auto Tie Balers

These balers are ideal for facilities dealing with a variety of materials and are commonly used in material recovery facilities, less-specific recycling operations, scrapyards, and landfills. With higher variability comes the trade-off of being able to use thinner wires than single ram auto ties, but two-rams can still use thick gauges.

For cardboard and newspaper baling, you should be looking for 11 to 13 gauge wire.

For plastic shrink wrap, other plastics, and foam, you should be looking for 11 or 12 gauge wire.

Choosing the right gauge can be confusing, and if you are in doubt about which gauges suit your requirements, contact Baling Wire Direct or your operation’s engineer.

How to Choose the Right Baling Wire for Your Requirements

One of the more well-known facts about baling wire is that it has a huge amount of potential usages. In an agricultural setting, it is often called farm wire due to its diverse applications on the farm and field, from mending fences to binding hay bales to even supporting loose mufflers. In industrial settings it is used to bind together cardboard, paper, metal sheeting, or other recyclable materials. This may lead you to think that any type of baling wire can be used for any type of fix, but this is not always the case. Often you need the right baling wire for the job.

You need to bundle together commodities

Whether you need to group, compact and keep together plastic, paper, cardboard, metal, or clothing you need a flexible baling wire that can be cut to whichever length you need. Single loop bale ties are the most commonly used baling wire for this purpose, and for good reason. They can be cut to almost any length the buyer requires, which also makes them perfect for a buyer with very specific requirements.

Single loop bale ties typically come in a variety of gauges (from 11 to 14) and typically range from 9 to 24 feet in length. The right gauge often depends on the equipment you have access to, and it is always recommended to find out the specific gauge your machine requires. If you use a different size to what your machine needs, your baling can become quite an arduous process.

Single loop bale ties can come in different types, some of which will suit your gauge requirements better or the specific baling process you want to undertake, whether it’s vertical, horizontal, auto tie, or two ram baling. For example, green bale ties are perfect for vertical baling of recyclables. Galvanized single loop bale ties are perfect for vertical, down-stroke and horizontal balers that need protection from corrosive substances and external damage.

You need to store commodities of different sizes or in challenging climates

If you need to store different sizes or types of cardboard, plastic, metal, or other commodities then you need a resilient baling wire with high tensile strength and a lot of gauge options. Black annealed wire is the perfect choice for this requirement. This wire is wax coated with individually annealed strands and means it is able to withstand even the harshest climates. These wires aren’t brittle, have increased flexibility, and a maintained atomic structure and are perfect for outdoor purposes.

You frequently need to bundle tightly compressed packages for shipping, storage or sale

If you need a wire that is incredibly strong, able to withstand a lot of pressure and lasts a long time, you need galvanized stem wire. It is high tensile, with an elongation of 8% and able to be used by auto-tie, two-ram, and even double-ram balers, as well as being able to withstand coiling during packaging. This wire is used by many for economic benefits. The steel inside the wire is galvanized in zinc to help it withstand against corrosion and provide steel protection for well over 100 years.