Browse Tag: baling wire

Why is Baling Wire so Expensive?

Baling wire is a material that has usefulness in the market because of its ability to help bundle large amounts of material. The recycling industry especially has a great use for baling wire to compress materials that need to be recycled and deliver them to the appropriate place.

One challenge businesses may have, however, is understanding the price of baling wire as in some instances, it can seem relatively high. There are reasons behind this that often have to do with the production process and other factors too. With that being said, here is why baling wire is so expensive for those who may be wondering.

Inflation

One of the primary reasons that baling wire can be so expensive is because of reasons like importation from foreign countries. To begin with, manufacturers located in China, as well as other countries outside of the US, have different quality standards and regulations than other countries do. This means that they can produce baling wire using a range of different materials and potentially cut costs in the process. This can directly impact the market and cause inflation for a number of reasons.

For one, manufacturers in the US usually have strict quality control which means they have rigid guidelines in place. This is to ensure they maintain a high standard and produce quality products. With that being said, seeing as US manufacturers can’t use cheap or harmful materials like lead when producing baling wire, they have to source quality raw materials which aren’t typically cheap.

Gauges

When buying baling wire, you will notice that they come in a range of different gauges. This could be anything from 11 to 14 gauge wires depending on the use. The longer the wire, the more you’re likely to pay, but you will find that there are discounts available if you tend to be a repeat customer or want to buy in bulk.

Types of Wire

There are different types of baling wire, and each goes through a different process before the final product is produced. Having said that, this can directly affect the price of the wire, so take that into consideration as well.

For instance, there is galvanized baling wire available which has an added coating of zinc so that it can withstand different environmental changes without undergoing corrosion. Because of the extra materials that are being used as well as the process, the price could potentially be more than anticipated.

On the other hand, there is also black annealed baling wire available which is more ductile and typically used for single-ram baling applications. Annealed wires are heated and then cooled, which again, is a different process which could contribute to it being sold at relatively high rates.

Most businesses are looking for ways to minimize expenses, so they like to know what they’re buying, for what price, and where they can potentially save. This can especially be said about baling wire seeing as it will be a recurring expense for recycling businesses and the likes in most cases. The above article hopefully gives you a better understanding as to why it’s priced at the rate it is.

What Kind of Glove is Best for Using Baling Wire

If you happen to be one of the many businesses out there that have everyday uses for baling wire, then it’s possible that you’re looking for the safest way to use it. It is imperative that you use the right gear when handling baling wire and one item you’re going to need is a good pair of gloves. However, you may not know which gloves are best to use as there are so many different types out there. Below, you’re going to find some information regarding the kind of gloves that are best for using baling wire.

Why You Need Gloves

For those who have never used baling wire before, you should know that gloves are a necessity. Because of the means in which you’ll be handling them, you want to keep your hands safe and avoid cuts as well as other accidents. As well as helping to protect your hands from injury, gloves are also needed to help prevent discomfort while working too.

Types of Gloves

There are different types of gloves on the market that are ideal for using baling wire. Your job is to explore the characteristics of each glove and ensure they meet your needs. Find a few gloves to consider buying below.

Safety Gloves: One type of gloves you should try is Polyco grip safety gloves. These are a good choice as they are high grip gloves that can be useful in a range of mechanical environments. They’re ideal for precision tasks or medium risk industries. Additionally, these kinds of gloves have light resistance to both water and oil which can be seen as an added bonus too.

Handler Gloves: Another pair of gloves that should help do the job when using baling wire is SuperTouch handler gloves. Some characteristics of these gloves that make them stand out is that they have a latex palm that helps if you want a better grip and the back of the glove is uncoated which makes it possible for your hand to breathe.

Foam Gloves: If you’re looking for great durability and comfort, then you should opt to get a pair of foam gloves. They also have enhanced abrasion resistance, high dexterity and are a fair price per pair.

Ultra-Safety Gloves: For a pair of gloves with extra protection and that is likely to last, you should try getting ultra-safety gloves. These types are one of the most versatile work gloves on the market. They offer protection against abrasion, scratches, and dirt as well as have a high level of tear resistance. They are said to be most suitable for construction, maintenance, and other purposes as well.

Full Dip Gloves: To protect you from a range of hazards, another good pair of gloves would be full dip ones. They have enhanced abrasion resistance like many of the others listed above.

There are gloves out there specifically made for the purpose of handling baling wire. You have a number to choose from, but it’s ultimately about your budget and preferences. After determining those two things, you can go on to buy a pair that will help you get the job done.

What is Bale Wire Used For

Baling wire is a multipurpose material, but you’re most likely going to find that it’s more pervasive in certain industries than others. It is a useful tool used in the recycling industry that is typically used to tie together and compress materials that need to be disposed of through means of recycling. This could include materials such as cardboard boxes or paper which need to be sent to landfills or in many cases, repurposed. Here you’re going to find out what exactly baling wire is used for and how you may be able to use it in your industry.

What is Bale Wire?

Bale wire which is often known as baling wire as well as a wire material made from steel that’s used to tie bales of a range of materials that have been compressed. Some of these materials may include plastic, paper or cardboard.

What is it Used For?

Bale wire has a number of purposes but for the most part, you’ll find it’s used to bundle up large materials in the neatest way possible so that they can be disposed of. Here are more specific uses of baling wire within different industries.

Recycling

Within the recycling industry, as mentioned above, you will find that bale is used to bind bales of compacted waste. It can then be transported to landfills or places where they will be recycled and reused. In addition to this, another common use of baling wire is for recycling balers that use it to make bales of compacted plastic as well as paper.

For the most part, you will find that baling wire can effectively tie waste that needs to be recycled which could help save space and do some good for the environment. It is also important as it keeps your waste from falling apart during the process of transporting it from one place to another.

Types of Baling Wire

You should also note that there are different types of baling wire, and you’ll see a few below.

Single Loop Wire

One common type of baling wire that you should make a note of is single loop wire. In terms of what it’s made of, it is manufactured from the black annealed wire and the galvanized wire using medium carbon steel. The usefulness of single loop wires is that they are highly flexible and can be cut in accordance with your requirements.

Double Loop Wire

Aside from single loop wire, you’ll also find that double loop wire is another type of baling wire, but it comes in pre-cut lengths. Both ends are bent with a loop which means that no bending is required, and you can use it a lot quicker.

Black Annealed Wire:

If you want something that’s relatively soft and can be used with different machines, then black annealed wire may be your best bet. It works with just about any baling machine and is coated with oil, so it moves through the baler easier.

Bale wire is a very flexible and versatile material that as you can see above, has multiple purposes. This could be why it continues to be used today for a range of purposes.

Is Galvanized Wire the Same as Baling Wire

If you haven’t heard much about baling wire or never used it before, it’s easy to get confused about exactly what it is as well as what it is used for. Nevertheless, it’s a wire material that is in the recycling industry as a means of helping to bundle and compress recyclable items. Having said that, there are many different terminologies for baling wire as well as different forms that they can take. For this reason, people often get confused about the difference between galvanized wire and baling wire. To find out whether galvanized wire is the same thing as baling wire, continue reading below.

What is Galvanizing?

To understand whether galvanized wire is the same as baling wire, you should first know what galvanizing is. It’s essentially when a layer of non-corrosive zinc is added over metals that are likely to corrode such as steel or iron. Seeing as zinc is less likely to negatively react to environmental changes, it is a way to ensure your baling wires last over long periods of times and withstand different environmental conditions.

An added bonus is that the material becomes more durable and resilient as the chances of them breaking under pressure significantly reduces. Ultimately, galvanizing makes your baling wire stronger and more likely to stand the test of time.

What is Baling Wire?

Now that you know what galvanizing is, the next question may be what exactly baling wire is. Based on the description of galvanizing, you may be able to gather that baling wire is simply wire made of steel or iron that doesn’t have any added layers of protection. However, the forms that the baling wire comes in is dependent on what it’s being used for and what type of machine that will be using it.

Are They The Same?

To answer the question, galvanized baling wire is classified as balling wire. It is just one of many different types. It is termed as galvanized because of the process that it goes through when it is being produced. As mentioned above, galvanized wire has an additional coating that is added to the wire which usually consists of protective materials such as zinc so that the wire has an extra layer of protection against corrosion and rust.

Similar to galvanized wire there is also annealed wire which again, has gone through a different process to help improve the quality. You will find that with annealed baling wire, there is decreased brittleness and increased strength. This is because the wire is heated and then slowly cooled in order to change the microstructure of the wire.

Although it can be confusing times, galvanized wire is baling wire, but the process of production and form it takes is what makes it somewhat different. As with any product, you have a range of options to choose from so that you’re able to use the wire for purposes that suit your unique needs. With that being said, hopefully, after reading the above article you have a lot more clarity regarding the differences and similarities between the two.

How Much Does Baling Wire Cost

As a business, one of the things that you should always focus on doing is cutting costs. You want to be sure you’re being as resourceful as possible and saving in every area that you can. If you work in recycling industry especially, then it wouldn’t be surprising if you frequently have to work with baling wire. However, seeing as you’ll likely need to use it in large quantities, buying it at a reasonable price is essential. Here is information on how much baling wire tends to cost on average which should help you when comparing costs and budgeting.

Quantity

Before you can determine how much baling wire costs, you have to take various factors into consideration, and one has to be quantity. Many suppliers offer different prices according to the quantity you want to order.

For instance, if you buy a bundle of 11 gauge galvanized single loop bale ties, you may have to buy a minimum of 5 bundles, and each contains 125 ties. At a length of 14ft, these bundles could come up to $345.

As shown in this example, for some suppliers, there is also a minimum order so take that into consideration when buying too. It’s often better to buy in bulk if you want to see reasonable discounts. In addition to this, some vendors are open to negotiation if you can guarantee them continued business and that you’ll buy in consistently large quantities. It may also benefit you as you have a better chance of discounts when you buy larger quantities.

In terms of quantity, as well as finding that some suppliers sell a particular number in each bundle, some sell according to weight per pack.

Measurements

Another factor to take into consideration is the length of galvanized wire you’re buying. This will also affect the price as it tends to come in a range of different lengths as people use it for different purposes. Some common lengths that you should find it in are anywhere from 13 to 21 feet. You may also find that they sell in meters or mm, so get ready to do conversions to ensure you’re getting your monies worth.

Price List Example

To give you an idea of what a price list for baling wire might look like, see the below. However, take into consideration that as mentioned above, every supplier is different and may require varying minimum orders as well as use different measurements in terms of quantity, weight or length.

5 bundles of 11 Gauge Galvanized Single Loop Bale Ties at 14 ft = $345

5 bundles of 11 Gauge Galvanized Single Loop Bale Ties at 15 ft = $370

5 bundles of 11 Gauge Galvanized Single Loop Bale Ties at 16 ft = $395

5 bundles of 11 Gauge Galvanized Single Loop Bale Ties at 17 ft = $415

5 bundles of 11 Gauge Galvanized Single Loop Bale Ties at 18 ft = $445

 

Baling wire is a material that can be used for an important function in your business. Managing waste, as well as space, is more important than you’d imagine. However, buying the baling wire at an affordable price should be your primary objective.

Can Baling Wire be Painted?

The recycling industry is one that rakes in millions every year. This is because there is so much waste that needs to be disposed of and the recycling industry has offered a practical solution for this. Have you ever wondered what goes on in your average recycling business on a daily basis? One thing may be gathering waste and bundling it together to be sent to the appropriate location. Baling wire is a material that will often be used in the process. If you’re curious about whether or not it can be painted, you’ll find your answer below.

What is Baling Wire

Baling wire is a material that has been around since the 1800s and has been used to make businesses operate a lot easier. In the recycling industry especially, it has been used to improve the way goods are bundled up and disposed of so that they can be reused or repurposed.

You will find that baling wire comes in a range of different types. One that you may know of is galvanized baling wire which is essentially covered in zinc to give it an added coat of protection so that it can withstand different types of environments.

Aside from this, you’ve also got double looped bale ties which are ideal if you’ve got applications that require high strength. There are loops located on both sides, so you don’t have to worry about doing any bending.

Beyond the ones mentioned, there are other types of baling wire which all have their unique strengths. It’s left to you to choose the right type based on your personal short and long-term needs.

Can it be Painted?

To answer the main question, baling wire can be painted if you choose to do so on your own, and you can also buy them painted. A common color you will usually see a bale tie painted is silver. You may also see a cobalt blue painted finish.

In terms of why you may want painted bale ties, they can give you the cleanliness that galvanized materials do as well as the extra strength that you can find in black annealed bale ties. They are especially useful if you intend on using it for any type of manual tie application seeing as they’re so easy to handle.

Painted hand tied baling wire is often recommended if you want to bale cardboard which you would be doing on a regular basis if you work in the recycling industry.

Another benefit of getting painted baling wire is that it helps to prevent rust which is important for longevity. Additionally, you’ll also find that it makes handling far cleaner, which is a plus too.

In conclusion, baling wire is a material that as mentioned above, helps makes packaging goods far easier. You no longer have to worry about items falling out and can have peace of mind knowing they’ll be safely and securely transported. If you want to paint them for any reason whatsoever, know that this can be done too.

The History of Baling Wire

Baling wirethe history of baling wire is a very versatile tool and is used in a number of different applications. It’s most commonly utilized in the agriculture industry and the recycling industry. The metal wire ties bales of grass, hay, paper, cardboard, and other such materials tightly. The materials are compressed and easier to transport. Baling wire isn’t a new of revolutionary product. It has been around for hundreds of years and has been used almost constantly by people in different industries. Here’s a brief look at the history of baling wire.

 

Where it all Began

We can trace the origins of baling wire back to the 1800s. It was commonly used in agriculture and farmers would often manually tie bales of hay and produce together. However, this material was confined to the agricultural industry and didn’t spread to other areas until a man named Charles Withington intervened.

He invented the first new prototype of the baling press that’s commonly used in a number of industries today. This machine was vastly different from the modern baling presses and relied on horse-drawn power to tie the bale. Back in 1879, this invention was revolutionary because it could easily secure bundles of hay together with little to no effort. The hay would be collected from one end and ejected from another. The famers would then use the baling wire to secure bale. This was usually done by hand.

This practice continued for several decades. While the baling presses evolved and become more sophisticated, the baling wire was still tied by hand. Manufacturers improved the overall quality of the wire and made it more resilient, but the process was still done by hand.

Spread to Other Industries

The use of baling press and wire spread to other industries, especially after the safer baling twine was introduced in the agriculture industry. Today, baling wire is commonly used in recycling, packing, transport, and construction industries.

If you have any further questions about baling wire, don’t hesitate to contact us today!

Most Common Bale Tie Used With Vertical Balers

Most Common Bale Tie Used With Vertical Balers

Vertical balers are very popular because they’re easy to use and don’t require much space. Most recycling facilities use them, especially if they process low to moderate amount of recycling material on a daily basis. Vertical balers are also more affordable compared to other options available in the market, which helps newly established recycling facilities, as the initial investment is quite low. Vertical balers have special requirements when it comes to baling wires so you need to make sure you use to best bale ties with your vertical balers.

Single Loop Bale Ties

This is the most common bale tie used in vertical balers. It’s available in a number of different gauges, including 13 gauge and 14 gauge. You need to choose a size that suits your baler. Most machines will come with an owner’s manual with instructions about the right baling wire. If you’re uncertain, you can also ask your local baling machines and material distributer for advice.

Single loop bale ties are very flexible because they need to be fed into the machine and cut manually. You can minimize wastage because you control the amount of material you use for baling. These wires are also available in different forms, including:

Single loop bale ties are great for compacted cardboard because they’re strong and resist the expansion of compacted materials. If you purchase good quality wires that are manufactured in USA and make sure the bales are tied securely, you will have no problems transporting the material. Single loop bale ties are recommended for vertical balers from manufacturers like Harmony, Cram-a-lot, Harris, Marathon, Selco, Max-Pak, and Bramidan. If you have machines from any of these companies, you can safely use single loop ties.

If you have any questions about bale ties, contact us today!

Best Way To Save Money On Baling Wire  

save money on baling wire

Baling wire is a recurring expense and can prove to be a financial burden if you won’t plan you expenses well. These wires might seem affordable in small quantities, but the cost can add up over time and eat into your profits. Thankfully, if you’re careful, you can save some money on baling wires by being smart about your purchase. Here are some tips on how to save money on this essential purchase.

Calculate how Much you Need over a Long Term

Baling wires aren’t perishable goods so you can easily store them for several months, if not years, without any problems. You just need to ensure that the wires are stored in a good location and aren’t exposed to excessive moisture and dirt. Calculate how much baling wire you will need over the course of several months and determine how much you can safely store on your property. You can make your purchase accordingly.

Bulk Orders

Once you’ve determined how much you’ll need over long term and how much you can store, you should consider placing pallet orders. The wires will arrive neatly packed and on pallets so you can easily store them in the corner of your facility.

Discounts

Baling wire manufactures often conduct sales and offer great discounts. It’s a good idea to take advantage of this opportunity and place a bulk order. Even a small 5 to 10% discount can help you save hundreds of dollars over a period of time.

Made in USA

Products manufactured in the US will not only be of superior quality, but also be easier to transport to your business location. That will have an impact on the overall cost of the purchase.

As you can see, you can easily save money on baling wire if you plan your purchase well. If you take the steps mentioned above, you’ll also never run out of baling wire and your business operations will run smoothly.

Notes:

  • If you order more than 10 bundles per year, place one large order annually and remove tons of costs on the freight!
  • Review your last 3 invoices before making your next purchase. We typically save our customers $100’s if not $1,000’s annually.
  • Don’t let your current supplier tell you that the wire you are using is what is causing the issue in the wire tie machine. This is a very old tactic used by the wire tie manufacturers who also sell wire. There are adjustments they can make to seamlessly feed another manufacturers wire!

If you have any questions about how to save money on baling wire, contact us today!

 

How is Black Annealed Wire Made?

 

black annealed box wire baling wire

Black annealed wire is one of the most popular baling wires in the recycling industry and because it’s easy to use and reduces the burden on the employees. Black annealed wire is very resilient and doesn’t corrode easily, which means it has a better shelf life. You can purchase this wire in bulk and store it in your facility without worry of rust or corrosion.

Black annealed wire is also more reliable and doesn’t break easily so you won’t have to deal with accidents during the tying process. It is specifically manufactured to endure pressure and bear the environmental conditions, which makes it ideal for the construction, agriculture, and recycling industry.

How it’s Made 

The untreated baling wire is exposed to the annealing process where it’s heated and cooled in a specific cycle in order to alter the physical and chemical composition of the metal. The process uses thermodynamics and the metal’s ability to react to heat to get the desired results. Annealing removes some of the hardness present in the metal and makes it much more ductile, which is a useful property in wires.

Annealed wires are much more flexible and easy to work with, which is why they’re commonly used in the recycling and baling industry. The underlying material is always steel and in most cases, the steel is galvanized for added resilience. The process for ferrous materials like steel is different because they react differently to heat.

While other materials are cooled down instantly by a dip in the water, steel is cooled over time to ensure the material doesn’t crack or become brittle during the process. The gradual cooling allows the metal to settle and retain the ductility and flexibility needed.

Black annealed wires also have a thin coating of light oil on it to help it pass through the baling machine easily. The oil also protects it from the environment and ensures it doesn’t rust. The wires are simply dipped into special oil until they’re all evenly coated before they’re coiled and packed away. You need to purchase black annealed wires from reliable manufacturers to ensure there’s no fault or weaknesses in them.

If you have any further questions about baling wire. Contact one of our team members here. 

  • 1
  • 2