What Types of Cardboard can be Baled?

Cardboard typically refers to corrugated fiberboard, but generally covers all heavy-duty paper products that are thicker and more durable than regular paper. Corrugated fiberboard is what most people think of as cardboard, and it is a popular packing material due to its lightweight and relative eco-friendliness due in part to its recyclable and biodegradable nature.

Paperboard

Paperboard is a single layered paper material typically used for packaging that needs to be less durable than corrugated fiberboards, such as folding cartons and set-up boxes. Paperboard can be configured as containerboard, folding boxboard, solid board (bleached or unbleached), white lined chipboard, or binder’s board.

Paperboard is one of the most frequently used packaging materials, used across many different industries. There is a lot of paperboard scrap created globally, and this should be recycled, having been first baled. Many different baling machines can bale paperboard, and depending on the size of the bale different gauges will be required. However, due to the massive variety of paperboard available, there are no specific baling wires required for paperboard baling. Dual ram, long stroke, auto tie, and manual tie horizontal balers can all be used to bale paperboard.

You may encounter some problems when baling paperboard due to estimating the gauge size required for the bale. For example, if you are baling together many different types of paperboard, the pressure that the baling wire needs to be strong enough but will also need to be different each time with each different bale composition. That’s why if you’re baling many different types of paperboard you should choose a wire on the lower gauge end of the scale, in case a bale contains thicker paperboard than usual (e.g., a bale composed of a higher percentage of white lined chipboard).

Corrugated Fiberboard

Corrugated cardboards come in different forms and designs. Typically you will be working with one of the following:

  • Single Face Cardboard – the most economical cardboard to buy, it is thinner than other cardboard but offers more protection than paperboard.
  • Single Wall Cardboard – this cardboard has a flute between two layers of paper, making this cardboard more durable than single face. Flutes gauges range from F to A, with A being the thickest and F offering the least thickness and hence the least protection from impact.
  • Double Wall Cardboard – this cardboard offers better impact protection due to its two layers.
  • Triple Wall Cardboard – this cardboard is so strong that it often is used in place of wood crates. It is used in heavy industrial

All corrugated fiberboard products can be baled by different cardboard balers, but they will require different gauge wires. If the same number of cardboard sheets were baled into equal volumes, single face cardboard would put the least pressure on the baling wire hence this requires a higher gauge. Whereas triple wall cardboard would put the most pressure on the baling wire and would require a thick gauge like 10 or 11.

If you have more questions pertaining to the suitability of your cardboard in baling operations, and the different wire gauges that may be suitable to your needs, contact Baling Wire Direct today

Explaining Cardboard Baling Wire

Few people without certain industrial or agricultural backgrounds have heard of baling wire. However, even those who know and use the term ‘haywire’ may not be aware that this term came from the excellent ability to bale or ‘hay’ wire to be used in machinery or farm equipment fixes. Though there are many different types of baling wire with many different gauge options, understanding the uses and features of cardboard baling wire is actually quite simple.

Uses

Baling wire was traditionally strong wire used to keep hay bales together on farms, but its tensile strength and ability to withstand pressure from packed items has made it widely used in the industrial sector to package commodities together. Cardboard is one such commodity that needs to be packaged at many stages along its life. When it is produced, it needs to be packed for shipping, whereas when it is being stored as stock it needs to be in bales, and when it is being recycled or disposed of in large quantities, it needs to be stored efficiently, which are achieved by baling. In short, cardboard baling allows better management of space by containing and compacting cardboard in a safe way.

Why is baling wire needed?

To those who aren’t familiar with baling, baling wire may seem like an extra variable cost that compacting cardboard does not require. However, despite compacting and baling having similar space-saving benefits, the process that is right for your business depends on what is happening to the cardboard after the process is undertaken. Baling and compacting reduce the volume of cardboard, but only baling keeps the materials safe for re-use. If you need to reduce the space of waste cardboard before simply disposing of it a compactor may be right for you, but if your cardboard is going to be re-used you need baling wire to keep the cardboard compact as well as safe and reusable.

Types

Baling wire comes in many different shapes and sizes.

  • Single Loop Bale Ties – single loop bale ties typically range from 9 to 24 feet in length but can be made in almost any length depending on the requirements. They come in gauge lengths from 11 to 14, and for cardboard, the gauge requirement depends on the baling machine to be used as well as the size of the bale. For example, if using a vertical baler, 13 or 14 gauge wire should be used for cardboard, but if you are using an auto tie baler you can form large bales that need the stronger 10 gauge wire to keep the cardboard safe and compressed.
  • Black Annealed Baling Wire – this baling wire is often the choice when there is only space to store cardboard outdoors (e.g., some recycling operations), as it is resistant to climate and environmental factors. It is also resilient and flexible, so if you have different sizes of cardboard that need to be stored you may want this wire.
  • Galvanized Stem Wire – if you are storing a high volume of cardboard in a bale, this wire is recommended due to its incredible strength.

Whatever the baling wire gauge or type you need for your cardboard Baling Wire Direct can assist you with its large selection of cardboard baling wire.

Choosing the Right Baling Wire Gauge: A Guide

Wire gauge is the thickness of wire. Some may find it confusing, but for historical reasons lower gauge wire is actually thicker. Choosing the right baling wire is important because if you choose wire that has too low a gauge for your needs you may not be maximizing your cost-effectiveness, and if you choose a wire that has too high a gauge it may not withstand the pressure and break.

Baling gauges depend on the type of baler you are using, as well as the density and dimensions of your bales. The material you are baling can also affect the type of gauge you need, as some materials put more pressure on wires than others.

Vertical Balers

Vertical balers are typically used for small volumes and limited budgets, good for producing about two bales a day. These balers commonly require 12, 13 or 14 gauge wire. They are commonly used to bale corrugated cardboard, plastic wrap, and textiles, but can bale other materials.

For cardboard: Look for lighter 13 or 14 gauge wire.

For newspaper: Look for slightly thicker 12 gauge wire, but 13 can often suffice.

For plastic shrink wrap: Look for 13 or 14 gauge wire.

For other plastics: The gauge may need to be as low as 12.

For foam: You need to use thicker wire, 11 gauge is standard, for example.

Horizontal Balers

Horizontal balers are for continuous use and can be automatic or manual, fit for processing wider ranges of materials such as thicker cardboard and plastic containers.

For cardboard: Horizontal balers can use wire as thick as 11 gauge, up to 13 gauge.

For newspaper: 12 or 13 gauge wire is still recommended.

For plastics (including shrink wrap): You can use 11 or 12 gauge wire.

For foam: 11 gauge is recommended with horizontal balers.

Single Ram Auto Tie Balers

Single ram auto tie balers are the best for baling high volumes of paper or corrugated cardboard and can use stronger wire. These are common in recycling centers, printing plants, and box manufacturers.

For almost all materials, single ram auto tie balers typically use 10, 11 or 12 gauge wire. The thickness needed often depends on the volume of material being baled. The exception is foam, for which 12 gauge wire is not strong enough. 10 or 11 gauge is hence recommended.

Two Ram Auto Tie Balers

These balers are ideal for facilities dealing with a variety of materials and are commonly used in material recovery facilities, less-specific recycling operations, scrapyards, and landfills. With higher variability comes the trade-off of being able to use thinner wires than single ram auto ties, but two-rams can still use thick gauges.

For cardboard and newspaper baling, you should be looking for 11 to 13 gauge wire.

For plastic shrink wrap, other plastics, and foam, you should be looking for 11 or 12 gauge wire.

Choosing the right gauge can be confusing, and if you are in doubt about which gauges suit your requirements, contact Baling Wire Direct or your operation’s engineer.

How to Choose the Right Baling Wire for Your Requirements

One of the more well-known facts about baling wire is that it has a huge amount of potential usages. In an agricultural setting, it is often called farm wire due to its diverse applications on the farm and field, from mending fences to binding hay bales to even supporting loose mufflers. In industrial settings it is used to bind together cardboard, paper, metal sheeting, or other recyclable materials. This may lead you to think that any type of baling wire can be used for any type of fix, but this is not always the case. Often you need the right baling wire for the job.

You need to bundle together commodities

Whether you need to group, compact and keep together plastic, paper, cardboard, metal, or clothing you need a flexible baling wire that can be cut to whichever length you need. Single loop bale ties are the most commonly used baling wire for this purpose, and for good reason. They can be cut to almost any length the buyer requires, which also makes them perfect for a buyer with very specific requirements.

Single loop bale ties typically come in a variety of gauges (from 11 to 14) and typically range from 9 to 24 feet in length. The right gauge often depends on the equipment you have access to, and it is always recommended to find out the specific gauge your machine requires. If you use a different size to what your machine needs, your baling can become quite an arduous process.

Single loop bale ties can come in different types, some of which will suit your gauge requirements better or the specific baling process you want to undertake, whether it’s vertical, horizontal, auto tie, or two ram baling. For example, green bale ties are perfect for vertical baling of recyclables. Galvanized single loop bale ties are perfect for vertical, down-stroke and horizontal balers that need protection from corrosive substances and external damage.

You need to store commodities of different sizes or in challenging climates

If you need to store different sizes or types of cardboard, plastic, metal, or other commodities then you need a resilient baling wire with high tensile strength and a lot of gauge options. Black annealed wire is the perfect choice for this requirement. This wire is wax coated with individually annealed strands and means it is able to withstand even the harshest climates. These wires aren’t brittle, have increased flexibility, and a maintained atomic structure and are perfect for outdoor purposes.

You frequently need to bundle tightly compressed packages for shipping, storage or sale

If you need a wire that is incredibly strong, able to withstand a lot of pressure and lasts a long time, you need galvanized stem wire. It is high tensile, with an elongation of 8% and able to be used by auto-tie, two-ram, and even double-ram balers, as well as being able to withstand coiling during packaging. This wire is used by many for economic benefits. The steel inside the wire is galvanized in zinc to help it withstand against corrosion and provide steel protection for well over 100 years.

How is Galvanized Stem Wire Made

The baling process is one that many industries conduct on a daily basis, especially those in the recycling and waste management industries. Baling wire is a material that is often used in the process to help bind materials that are going to be transported and keep them in one piece. There are different types of baling wire and one is referred to galvanized stem wire. It goes through a different process than other baling wire and is known for being one of the strongest and most durable types. If you’ve heard of this before but never exactly understood what it is as well as what it’s made of, here is a breakdown below.

What is Galvanized Stem Wire?

For those who have never heard of it before, galvanized stem wire is used for the purposes of bundling large packages and preparing them to be shipped, stored, or sold. This is necessary so that items are tightly compressed, compact and safe at all times, especially while being transported. Galvanized stem wire which is often referred to as carrier wire, stump wire, or stand wire, is commonly used during the baling process while helping to package recyclable items like plastic, cardboard, or just about anything else that can be recycled.

For the most part, this type of wire can withstand enormous amounts of pressure and last over a long period of time. It has even been said that it can provide ongoing protection for steel for up to 170 years which is a few lifetimes.

How is it Made?

In terms of how galvanized stem wire is made, it’s usually coated with a material such as zinc. This is because zinc is known to be able to withstand different environments making it more of a practical material in terms of longevity. This makes it more resistant against rust and corrosion, which is one of the reasons that it’s able to last for so long.

For galvanized stem wire to be made effectively, the right amount of zinc coating needs to be added to the underlying material. Modern manufacturers tend to use an electroplating technique in which they add a thin layer of zinc over the underlying material.

Another approach would be the hot-dip technique which is where the iron or steel material is dipped into liquid zinc, and then a thick layer is formed over the material.

More technically, once the wire is removed from the dip, the zinc will be exposed to oxygen, and then zinc oxide is formed. That zinc oxide then reacts with the carbon dioxide that’s present in the atmosphere and creates zinc carbonate.

Galvanized stem wire is a quality product that is often worth the buy when correctly sourced. Knowing that your wires are likely to last for many years to come can make you feel as though it is worth every dollar spent. Also, knowing the process that it goes through to become the quality stem wire you use on a daily basis can give you a deeper appreciation for it as well.

Why is Baling Wire so Expensive?

Baling wire is a material that has usefulness in the market because of its ability to help bundle large amounts of material. The recycling industry especially has a great use for baling wire to compress materials that need to be recycled and deliver them to the appropriate place.

One challenge businesses may have, however, is understanding the price of baling wire as in some instances, it can seem relatively high. There are reasons behind this that often have to do with the production process and other factors too. With that being said, here is why baling wire is so expensive for those who may be wondering.

Inflation

One of the primary reasons that baling wire can be so expensive is because of reasons like importation from foreign countries. To begin with, manufacturers located in China, as well as other countries outside of the US, have different quality standards and regulations than other countries do. This means that they can produce baling wire using a range of different materials and potentially cut costs in the process. This can directly impact the market and cause inflation for a number of reasons.

For one, manufacturers in the US usually have strict quality control which means they have rigid guidelines in place. This is to ensure they maintain a high standard and produce quality products. With that being said, seeing as US manufacturers can’t use cheap or harmful materials like lead when producing baling wire, they have to source quality raw materials which aren’t typically cheap.

Gauges

When buying baling wire, you will notice that they come in a range of different gauges. This could be anything from 11 to 14 gauge wires depending on the use. The longer the wire, the more you’re likely to pay, but you will find that there are discounts available if you tend to be a repeat customer or want to buy in bulk.

Types of Wire

There are different types of baling wire, and each goes through a different process before the final product is produced. Having said that, this can directly affect the price of the wire, so take that into consideration as well.

For instance, there is galvanized baling wire available which has an added coating of zinc so that it can withstand different environmental changes without undergoing corrosion. Because of the extra materials that are being used as well as the process, the price could potentially be more than anticipated.

On the other hand, there is also black annealed baling wire available which is more ductile and typically used for single-ram baling applications. Annealed wires are heated and then cooled, which again, is a different process which could contribute to it being sold at relatively high rates.

Most businesses are looking for ways to minimize expenses, so they like to know what they’re buying, for what price, and where they can potentially save. This can especially be said about baling wire seeing as it will be a recurring expense for recycling businesses and the likes in most cases. The above article hopefully gives you a better understanding as to why it’s priced at the rate it is.

What Kind of Glove is Best for Using Baling Wire

If you happen to be one of the many businesses out there that have everyday uses for baling wire, then it’s possible that you’re looking for the safest way to use it. It is imperative that you use the right gear when handling baling wire and one item you’re going to need is a good pair of gloves. However, you may not know which gloves are best to use as there are so many different types out there. Below, you’re going to find some information regarding the kind of gloves that are best for using baling wire.

Why You Need Gloves

For those who have never used baling wire before, you should know that gloves are a necessity. Because of the means in which you’ll be handling them, you want to keep your hands safe and avoid cuts as well as other accidents. As well as helping to protect your hands from injury, gloves are also needed to help prevent discomfort while working too.

Types of Gloves

There are different types of gloves on the market that are ideal for using baling wire. Your job is to explore the characteristics of each glove and ensure they meet your needs. Find a few gloves to consider buying below.

Safety Gloves: One type of gloves you should try is Polyco grip safety gloves. These are a good choice as they are high grip gloves that can be useful in a range of mechanical environments. They’re ideal for precision tasks or medium risk industries. Additionally, these kinds of gloves have light resistance to both water and oil which can be seen as an added bonus too.

Handler Gloves: Another pair of gloves that should help do the job when using baling wire is SuperTouch handler gloves. Some characteristics of these gloves that make them stand out is that they have a latex palm that helps if you want a better grip and the back of the glove is uncoated which makes it possible for your hand to breathe.

Foam Gloves: If you’re looking for great durability and comfort, then you should opt to get a pair of foam gloves. They also have enhanced abrasion resistance, high dexterity and are a fair price per pair.

Ultra-Safety Gloves: For a pair of gloves with extra protection and that is likely to last, you should try getting ultra-safety gloves. These types are one of the most versatile work gloves on the market. They offer protection against abrasion, scratches, and dirt as well as have a high level of tear resistance. They are said to be most suitable for construction, maintenance, and other purposes as well.

Full Dip Gloves: To protect you from a range of hazards, another good pair of gloves would be full dip ones. They have enhanced abrasion resistance like many of the others listed above.

There are gloves out there specifically made for the purpose of handling baling wire. You have a number to choose from, but it’s ultimately about your budget and preferences. After determining those two things, you can go on to buy a pair that will help you get the job done.

What is Bale Wire Used For

Baling wire is a multipurpose material, but you’re most likely going to find that it’s more pervasive in certain industries than others. It is a useful tool used in the recycling industry that is typically used to tie together and compress materials that need to be disposed of through means of recycling. This could include materials such as cardboard boxes or paper which need to be sent to landfills or in many cases, repurposed. Here you’re going to find out what exactly baling wire is used for and how you may be able to use it in your industry.

What is Bale Wire?

Bale wire which is often known as baling wire as well as a wire material made from steel that’s used to tie bales of a range of materials that have been compressed. Some of these materials may include plastic, paper or cardboard.

What is it Used For?

Bale wire has a number of purposes but for the most part, you’ll find it’s used to bundle up large materials in the neatest way possible so that they can be disposed of. Here are more specific uses of baling wire within different industries.

Recycling

Within the recycling industry, as mentioned above, you will find that bale is used to bind bales of compacted waste. It can then be transported to landfills or places where they will be recycled and reused. In addition to this, another common use of baling wire is for recycling balers that use it to make bales of compacted plastic as well as paper.

For the most part, you will find that baling wire can effectively tie waste that needs to be recycled which could help save space and do some good for the environment. It is also important as it keeps your waste from falling apart during the process of transporting it from one place to another.

Types of Baling Wire

You should also note that there are different types of baling wire, and you’ll see a few below.

Single Loop Wire

One common type of baling wire that you should make a note of is single loop wire. In terms of what it’s made of, it is manufactured from the black annealed wire and the galvanized wire using medium carbon steel. The usefulness of single loop wires is that they are highly flexible and can be cut in accordance with your requirements.

Double Loop Wire

Aside from single loop wire, you’ll also find that double loop wire is another type of baling wire, but it comes in pre-cut lengths. Both ends are bent with a loop which means that no bending is required, and you can use it a lot quicker.

Black Annealed Wire:

If you want something that’s relatively soft and can be used with different machines, then black annealed wire may be your best bet. It works with just about any baling machine and is coated with oil, so it moves through the baler easier.

Bale wire is a very flexible and versatile material that as you can see above, has multiple purposes. This could be why it continues to be used today for a range of purposes.

Is Galvanized Wire the Same as Baling Wire

If you haven’t heard much about baling wire or never used it before, it’s easy to get confused about exactly what it is as well as what it is used for. Nevertheless, it’s a wire material that is in the recycling industry as a means of helping to bundle and compress recyclable items. Having said that, there are many different terminologies for baling wire as well as different forms that they can take. For this reason, people often get confused about the difference between galvanized wire and baling wire. To find out whether galvanized wire is the same thing as baling wire, continue reading below.

What is Galvanizing?

To understand whether galvanized wire is the same as baling wire, you should first know what galvanizing is. It’s essentially when a layer of non-corrosive zinc is added over metals that are likely to corrode such as steel or iron. Seeing as zinc is less likely to negatively react to environmental changes, it is a way to ensure your baling wires last over long periods of times and withstand different environmental conditions.

An added bonus is that the material becomes more durable and resilient as the chances of them breaking under pressure significantly reduces. Ultimately, galvanizing makes your baling wire stronger and more likely to stand the test of time.

What is Baling Wire?

Now that you know what galvanizing is, the next question may be what exactly baling wire is. Based on the description of galvanizing, you may be able to gather that baling wire is simply wire made of steel or iron that doesn’t have any added layers of protection. However, the forms that the baling wire comes in is dependent on what it’s being used for and what type of machine that will be using it.

Are They The Same?

To answer the question, galvanized baling wire is classified as balling wire. It is just one of many different types. It is termed as galvanized because of the process that it goes through when it is being produced. As mentioned above, galvanized wire has an additional coating that is added to the wire which usually consists of protective materials such as zinc so that the wire has an extra layer of protection against corrosion and rust.

Similar to galvanized wire there is also annealed wire which again, has gone through a different process to help improve the quality. You will find that with annealed baling wire, there is decreased brittleness and increased strength. This is because the wire is heated and then slowly cooled in order to change the microstructure of the wire.

Although it can be confusing times, galvanized wire is baling wire, but the process of production and form it takes is what makes it somewhat different. As with any product, you have a range of options to choose from so that you’re able to use the wire for purposes that suit your unique needs. With that being said, hopefully, after reading the above article you have a lot more clarity regarding the differences and similarities between the two.

How Much Does Baling Wire Cost

As a business, one of the things that you should always focus on doing is cutting costs. You want to be sure you’re being as resourceful as possible and saving in every area that you can. If you work in recycling industry especially, then it wouldn’t be surprising if you frequently have to work with baling wire. However, seeing as you’ll likely need to use it in large quantities, buying it at a reasonable price is essential. Here is information on how much baling wire tends to cost on average which should help you when comparing costs and budgeting.

Quantity

Before you can determine how much baling wire costs, you have to take various factors into consideration, and one has to be quantity. Many suppliers offer different prices according to the quantity you want to order.

For instance, if you buy a bundle of 11 gauge galvanized single loop bale ties, you may have to buy a minimum of 5 bundles, and each contains 125 ties. At a length of 14ft, these bundles could come up to $345.

As shown in this example, for some suppliers, there is also a minimum order so take that into consideration when buying too. It’s often better to buy in bulk if you want to see reasonable discounts. In addition to this, some vendors are open to negotiation if you can guarantee them continued business and that you’ll buy in consistently large quantities. It may also benefit you as you have a better chance of discounts when you buy larger quantities.

In terms of quantity, as well as finding that some suppliers sell a particular number in each bundle, some sell according to weight per pack.

Measurements

Another factor to take into consideration is the length of galvanized wire you’re buying. This will also affect the price as it tends to come in a range of different lengths as people use it for different purposes. Some common lengths that you should find it in are anywhere from 13 to 21 feet. You may also find that they sell in meters or mm, so get ready to do conversions to ensure you’re getting your monies worth.

Price List Example

To give you an idea of what a price list for baling wire might look like, see the below. However, take into consideration that as mentioned above, every supplier is different and may require varying minimum orders as well as use different measurements in terms of quantity, weight or length.

5 bundles of 11 Gauge Galvanized Single Loop Bale Ties at 14 ft = $345

5 bundles of 11 Gauge Galvanized Single Loop Bale Ties at 15 ft = $370

5 bundles of 11 Gauge Galvanized Single Loop Bale Ties at 16 ft = $395

5 bundles of 11 Gauge Galvanized Single Loop Bale Ties at 17 ft = $415

5 bundles of 11 Gauge Galvanized Single Loop Bale Ties at 18 ft = $445

 

Baling wire is a material that can be used for an important function in your business. Managing waste, as well as space, is more important than you’d imagine. However, buying the baling wire at an affordable price should be your primary objective.